Skydiving Fast and Easy

The drop zone in skydiving is the area a skydiver aims at to land when he jumps from the plane. This is the entire area where the diver leaves the plane and over which he drifts as he descends, as well as where he is expected to touch down when he hits the ground.

Therefore, the skydive drop zone is the whole region where people learn to and then practice skydiving. There are three primary ways to learn skydiving, and each depends upon the amount of time and money one is willing to spend. You can choose between tandem diving, static line diving and accelerated free fall. Each is designed to give you the experience of skydiving in varying degrees.

The way you choose to skydive for the first time will be determined by what you hope to derive from the skydiving experience. Your initial experience should be designed to acquaint you with the sport, while expanding your horizons and giving you fun and excitement.

The first type of skydiving that most people engage in is tandem skydiving. It is a great way to experience skydiving while taking little risk and without too much prior preparation. In this method of skydiving, a drogue parachute is used, which allows the parachute to open during a quick descent and then slow the descent down considerably so that the descent can be used as a training tool. Most skydiving centers and schools use tandem jumping as the first jump a student will try, but many people simply use tandem jumping for the one time jump of their lives just to experience this thrill.

Tandem skydiving means that the student is literally connected (by a harness) to the instructor during the dive. The student can choose to do nothing and enjoy the ride, or can learn by doing as the dive is taking place. In either case, the instructor has total, final control over the dive.

Another method by which to learn skydiving is the static line. In this method, the parachute is connected to a static line on the plane, and the parachute is deployed automatically as soon as the diver leaves the plane.

A final way to learn is the accelerated free fall. In this method, one or more instructors, usually two, accompany the student on his jump and assist and instruct him as he dives. If the student is unsure about how to deploy the parachute, the trainer can just reach over and show him what to do. If there is still a problem, the instructor will pull the student’s chute himself. This is the fastest way to a free fall dive. As a rule, there are at least three accompanied dives before the student can skydive solo.

Instructors are responsible for determining when a student is ready for a solo skydive by observing how he managed to dive into the sky dive drop zone area. There is nothing like that first experience of pulling your own ripcord when skydiving!